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Dialectical Thinking and Adult Creativity

  • Suzanne Benack
  • Michael Basseches
  • Thomas Swan
Chapter
Part of the Perspectives on Individual Differences book series (PIDF)

Abstract

Perhaps because most work on creativity has originated in personality and social psychology, there has been little attention given to transformations of creativity across the lifespan. Researchers have generally taken one of two approaches. Those interested in deriving nomothetic tests of creative ability or in studying social factors affecting creative performance have focussed on very general features of the creative process equally applicable to people of a wide range of ages and levels of expertise in a domain. Other researchers have been interested in describing the creative process in adults who have made notable creative achievements in public fields, for example, creative artists and scientists. Although both of these approaches have been fruitful to the study of creativity, neither lends itself to the investigation of developmental changes in creative functioning.

Keywords

Creative Process Formal Operation Dialectical Process Creative Thought Creative Response 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Suzanne Benack
    • 1
  • Michael Basseches
    • 2
  • Thomas Swan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUnion CollegeSchenectadyUSA
  2. 2.Clinical Developmental InstituteMassachusetts School of Professional PsychologyBelmontUSA

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