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Neuropsychological Bases of Common Learning and Behavior Problems in Children

  • Elizabeth Murdoch James
  • Marion Selz
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

Increased interest and research into the possible neuropsychological bases of learning and behavior problems seen in children has been sustained in the past decade by promising results from researchers in the fields of learning disabilities, neuropsychology, neurophysiology, and cognitive psychology. Advances have been made in the neuropsychological assessment of children, accuracy of identification of specific subtypes of learning problems, identification and measurement of possible underlying neural mechanisms of childhood learning and behavioral disorders, and in the understanding of how these factors may interact.

Keywords

Behavior Problem Left Hemisphere Reading Disability Learn Disability Developmental Dyslexia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elizabeth Murdoch James
    • 1
  • Marion Selz
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Educational PsychologyTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA
  2. 2.Carondelet Rehabilitation Services of ArizonaTucsonUSA

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