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Neuropsychological and Neurobehavioral Sequelae Associated with Pediatric HIV Infection

  • Antolin M. Llorente
  • Christine M. LoPresti
  • Paul Satz
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

Neuropsychological and neurobehavioral dysfunctions in infancy and childhood, resulting from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, warrant distinct consideration in a handbook of this nature. This merit stems from the unique impact of this disease process on the rapidly maturing central nervous system (CNS) of the child (Epstein et al., 1986; Falloon, Eddy, Wiener, & Pizzo, 1989; Pizzo & Wilfert, 1994) in conjunction with the historical scientific and clinical purview of neuro-psychology as the study of brain-behavior relationships (Lezak, 1995).

Keywords

Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Acquire Immune Deficiency Syndrome Infected Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antolin M. Llorente
    • 1
  • Christine M. LoPresti
    • 2
  • Paul Satz
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsBaylor College of Medicine, and Texas Children’s HospitalHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral SciencesUniversity of California, Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

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