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Neuropsychological Sequelae of Substance Abuse by Children and Youth

  • Robert William Elliott
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

Substance abuse by children and youths continues to be a problem of international scope. In comparison with a number of years ago, the drugs available for illicit use have become more potent, more addictive, and, as a consequence, perhaps more damaging to the central nervous system (CNS). Although not all illicit drugs are chronically damaging, all drugs produce acute neurological and neuropsychological impairment (Hartman, 1995). Youth, as a group, throughout history have used alcohol and other psychoactive substances to affect their sensory system, creating acute and sometimes permanent problems (Bukstein, 1995).

Keywords

Illicit Drug Anabolic Steroid High School Senior Neuropsychological Deficit Neuropsychological Impairment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert William Elliott
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Student ServicesRedondo Beach Unified School DistrictRedondo BeachUSA

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