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Neuropsychological Effects of Stimulant Medication on Children’s Learning and Behavior

  • Ronald T. Brown
  • Elizabeth Dreelin
  • Arden D. Dingle
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

Stimulants refer to a class of drugs that produce excitation of the central nervous system (CNS) and have been used in the treatment of children and adolescents since the 1930s (Bradley, 1937). Since then, there has been consistent interest in the clinical application of stimulant medication; however, systematic research efforts did not begin until the 1960s (Brown & Borden, 1989), when more rigorous methodology was employed. The focus of this research was on the identification and assessment of target behaviors and side effects in controlled clinical trials. These investigations emphasize several different areas: short-term efficacy, atypical drug response, organic etiologies, predictors of drug response, long-term outcome of treatment, negative consequences, and the use of additional therapeutic modalities in conjunction with stimulants (Jacobvitz, Sroufe, Stewart, & Leffert, 1990). The short-term efficacy studies include carefully controlled drug placebo trials, use in various settings, effects on learning andachievement, dose—response curves, and impact on socialization (Jacobvitz et al., 1990).

Keywords

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Adolescent Psychiatry Stimulant Medication Attention Deficit Disorder Closed Head Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald T. Brown
    • 1
  • Elizabeth Dreelin
    • 2
  • Arden D. Dingle
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and PediatricsEmory UniversityAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesEmory UniversityAtlantaUSA

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