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Treating Traumatic Brain Injury in the School

Mandates and Methods
  • Ruth Adlof Haak
  • Ronald B. Livingston
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

In the last few years, a proliferation of information has become available to the professionals who serve children with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The scientific community, government-sponsored research and development centers, new professional activities, and new professional societies dealing with the education and credentialing of workers in these activities have all contributed a wealth of information. Numerous medical facilities have also sprung up to treat children with TBI and to offer their expertise to the growing field. Rarely has a field of endeavor in the human services grown so quickly as has the recent effort to deal more effectively with our brain-injured population.

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Brain Injury Head Injury Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Closed Head Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ruth Adlof Haak
    • 1
  • Ronald B. Livingston
    • 2
  1. 1.Eanes Independent School DistrictAustinUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Texas at TylerTylerUSA

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