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Pediatric Brain Injury Rehabilitation in a Neurodevelopmental Milieu

  • Elaine Fletcher-Janzen
  • H. Dennis Kade
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been coined the “silent epidemic” because its frequency and disabling effects have largely been unrecognized by the professional community and the public (Ylvisaker, 1985). TBI is the leading cause of death and disability in children and adolescents in the United States and it is the principal cause of brain damage in young adults (Miller, 1992). More than one million children sustain brain injuries annually, and approximately 165,000 require hospitalization (National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities [NICCYD], 1993). Between 30 and 50% of injuries are moderate, severe, or fatal (Begali, 1992). In addition to the incidence of TBI, 5000 new cases of epilepsy caused by head trauma are reported each year (Miller, 1992). The incidence of TBI is not randomly distributed through the population. Males are about twice as likely as females to sustain a brain injury and their death rate from these injuries is four times that of females (Ball & Zinner, 1993). The most frequent causes of TBI are motor vehicle crashes (with alcohol involvement) (Ball & Zinner, 1993; Rusonis, 1990), falls, sports, and abuse/assault (Goldstein & Levin, 1990; NICCYD, 1993).

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Brain Injury Head Injury Compensatory Strategy Cognitive Rehabilitation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elaine Fletcher-Janzen
    • 1
  • H. Dennis Kade
    • 2
  1. 1.The Brown Schools of West TexasMidlandUSA
  2. 2.Psychology DepartmentCumberland Hospital for Children and AdolescentsNew KentUSA

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