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Utilizing a Neuropsychological Paradigm for Understanding Common Educational and Psychological Tests

  • Rik Carl D’Amato
  • Barbara A. Rothlisberg
  • Robert L. Rhodes
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

The field of psychology has long been marked by philosophical diversity and theoretical movements devoted to the investigation of individual differences (D’Amato & Rothlisberg, 1992). Scores of single paradigm assessment approaches designed to provide appropriate diagnosis and treatment of individual difficulties have come to the forefront, only to be eclipsed later by rival viewpoints or theoretical perspectives (e.g., psychoanalysis, behaviorism). Throughout this procession of philosophies and theories, countless numbers of educational and psychological tests have been administered and interpreted in an effort to better understand the abilities and needs of the individuals in question. The purpose of this chapter is to help consolidate available information and provide an integrative approach to the neuropsychological interpretation of common measures.

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Neuropsychological Assessment Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales Processing Style Cerebral Impairment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rik Carl D’Amato
    • 1
  • Barbara A. Rothlisberg
    • 2
  • Robert L. Rhodes
    • 3
  1. 1.Division of Professional PsychologyUniversity of Northern ColoradoGreeleyUSA
  2. 2.Department of Educational PsychologyBall State UniversityMuncieUSA
  3. 3.School Psychology Program, Special Education/Communication Disorders DepartmentNew Mexico State UniversityLas CrucesUSA

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