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Abstract

Confocal microscopes commonly generate their images not as real or virtual patterns of light but as pixels in the memory of a computer. This gives the image a measure of permanence—once acquired, it will not fade—but it will be lost if the computer is turned off or if that area of memory is overwritten. To store that image with all its information intact, we must write it in digital form: A copy on paper or film, however good, cannot contain all the information of the original. However, data stored on disk or tape is not directly accessible to human senses. For publication or presentation of the image we must have either a “hard copy” or an image on an electronic display—a picture that can be viewed by the human eye.

Keywords

Confocal Image Floppy Disk Laser Printer Mass Storage Film Recorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guy Cox
    • 1
  1. 1.Electron Microscope UnitUniversity of SydneySydneyAustralia

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