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Labeling Biotech Foods

Implications for consumer welfare and trade
  • Elise Golan
  • Fred Kuchler

Abstract

Whether biotech agricultural products should be labeled has become an issue of contention both within the United States and between the United States and its trading partners.1 Economists tend to argue that labeling and product differentiation of biotech and nonbiotech commodities and food products would expand consumer welfare. Such labeling would increase consumer choice and allow consumers to participate in determining the mix of biotech and nonbiotech products that are produced.

Keywords

Soybean Meal Consumer Surplus Price Premium Consumer Welfare Production Externality 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elise Golan
    • 1
  • Fred Kuchler
    • 1
  1. 1.Economic Research ServiceDepartment of Agriculture (USDA)USA

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