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Membrane Aging of the Brain Synaptosomes with Special Reference to Gangliosides

  • Susumu Ando
  • Yasukazu Tanaka
  • Kazuo Kon
Part of the FIDIA Research Series book series (FIDIA, volume 6)

Abstract

Giacobini (1982) has proposed an idea of synaptic aging, according to which synapses are functionally developed to the maximal state in the developmental stage, and then may deteriorate in their function in senescence. Giacobini emphasized the relevance of reduced synaptic transmission to malfunction of the aging brain. Agerelated alterations of synaptic functions have been reported in terms of the levels, synthetic rates and releasing activities of neurotransmitters. Gibson and Peterson (1981a) reported the reduced synthetic rate of acetylcholine in aged mice with little change in acetylcholine content. Gibson and Peterson (1981b) also pointed out that the release of acetylcholine is severely affected with aging. We assumed that possible alterations of synaptic membranes would be responsible for the decrease In neurotransmission. We, therefore, have isolated synaptosomes from different age groups of mice and rats, and attempted to correlate the membrane changes with altered synaptic functions such as acetylcholine release.

Keywords

Fluorescence Polarization Acetylcholine Release Neuraminidase Treatment Total Ganglioside Membrane Microviscosity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abbreviations

TLC

thin layer chromatography

ESR

electron spin resonace.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susumu Ando
    • 1
  • Yasukazu Tanaka
    • 1
  • Kazuo Kon
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryTokyo Metropolitan Institute of GerontologyTokyo-173Japan

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