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The Lexicon of Louisiana French

  • Thomas A. Klingler
  • Michael D. Picone
  • Albert Valdman
Chapter
Part of the Topics in Language and Linguistics book series (TLLI)

Abstract

We chose to entitle this chapter “The Lexicon of Louisiana French,” rather than “The Lexicon of Cajun French and Louisiana Creole,” to underscore the dilemma faced in the description of the lexical resources available to speakers of these languages. The line of demarcation between the two languages is even fuzzier for the lexicon than for the grammar and the phonology. As the review of the literature will show, the information currently available on the lexicon of the two languages remains too incomplete and fragmentary to help one determine whether speakers draw on a common lexical stock, whether they have access to a relatively well delimited lexicon specific to each of the two languages, or whether they have at their disposal a lexical stock that varies from region to region but is shared by the speakers of a particular regional variety of Cajun French (CF) and Louisiana Creole (LC).

Keywords

Baton Rouge Lexical Item Lexical Resource Contextual Citation Code Switching 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas A. Klingler
    • 1
  • Michael D. Picone
    • 2
  • Albert Valdman
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of French and ItalianTulane UniversityNew OrleansUSA
  2. 2.Department of Romance Languages and ClassicsUniversity of AlabamaTuscaloosaUSA
  3. 3.Creole InstituteIndiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA

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