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Structural Aspects and Current Sociolinguistic Situation of Acadian French

  • Karin Flikeid
Chapter
Part of the Topics in Language and Linguistics book series (TLLI)

Abstract

The reason for including in this volume a full chapter devoted exclusively to Acadian French is the importance of the Acadian group in the formation of Louisiana French. This relationship was discussed from a historical point of view in Chapter 1 and will be addressed linguistically by Pierre Rezeau in Chapter 12. To recapitulate briefly: After the Deportation (1755–1763), groups of exiled Acadians made their way to Louisiana, where they settled in various parts of the territory. There are significant differences in exile itineraries among the successive waves of migration to Louisiana. These movements of population parallel the waves of return migration to the Maritime Provinces that are known to have had linguistic consequences for the geographic diversity inherent in Acadian French. Notably, a crucial distinction lies in the location in which each particular group spent the years of exile and how long a period was involved. In both Louisiana and the Maritimes, a number of Acadians arrived at a relatively early date, in the 1760s, from the colonies of the Atlantic seaboard, where they had been deported directly by sea in 1755 from their Acadian homelands. Others returned to North America subsequent to 1785, after a lengthy exile in France, which had been the major destination to which Acadians were expelled after 1758; in the case of Louisiana, this component was the larger of the two major sources of Acadian influx.

Keywords

Nova Scotia Language Shift Maritime Province Code Switching Atlantic Seaboard 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karin Flikeid
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Modern Languages and ClassicsSt Mary’s UniversityHalifaxCanada

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