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HACCP and product quality

  • S. J. Forsythe
  • P. R. Hayes

Abstract

The food processing industry is currently implementing new management systems (Anon, 1992). One programme is Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) to eliminate the risks of food consumption and subsequently reduce the current increasing number of reported food poisoning outbreaks. Total Quality Management (TQM) regimes are also being incorporated and the possibility of integrating HACCP with Quality Assurance programmes (ISO 9000 series) has been proposed (Stringer, 1993).

Keywords

Total Quality Management Food Protection Food Microbiology Critical Control Point Food Hygiene 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. J. Forsythe
    • 1
  • P. R. Hayes
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Life SciencesThe Nottingham Trent UniversityNottinghamUK
  2. 2.formerly of Department of MicrobiologyThe University of LeedsLeedsUK

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