Advertisement

Design of food processing equipment

  • S. J. Forsythe
  • P. R. Hayes

Abstract

Until comparatively recently manufacturers have concerned themselves almost exclusively with the mechanical design and operational requirements of food processing equipment and have tended to neglect hygiene considerations. Equip­ment should be designed and constructed so that cleaning, maintenance and inspection are facilitated. Parts of the equipment that come into contact with food should be capable of being easily dismantled, (unless clean-in-place systems are being considered), thoroughly cleaned and, if necessary, sterilized. Equipment should protect the food from both external and internal contamina­tion as well as perform the function for which it was originally designed.

Keywords

Centrifugal Pump Food Material Screw Conveyor Butterfly Valve Manual Cleaning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Bibliography

  1. Briston, J.H. and Katan, L.L. (1974). Plastics in Contact with Food. London, Food Trade Press LtdGoogle Scholar
  2. Campden Food Preservation Research Association (CFPRA). (1982). The Principles of Design for Hygienic Food Processing Machinery. Technical Memorandum No. 289.Google Scholar
  3. Katsuyama, A.M. and Strachan, J.P. (1980). Principles of Food Processing Sanitation. Washington, Food Processors Institute.Google Scholar
  4. Milledge, J.J. (1981). The hygienic design of food plant. Proceedings of the Institute of Food Science and Technology, 14, 74–86.Google Scholar
  5. Stinson. W. (1978). Sanitary design principles for food processing plants. Food Processing, Mid-July, 98–108.Google Scholar

References

  1. Alwis, A.A.P. de and Fryer, P.J. (1990). The use of direct resistance heating in the food industry. Journal of Food Engineering, 11, 3–27.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). (1987). Food, Drug and Beverage Equipment, ASME/ANSI F2.1 — 1986, New York, ASME.Google Scholar
  3. Biss, C.H., Coombes, S.A. and Skudder, P.J. (1989). The development and applications of ohmic heating for the continuous processing of particulate foodstuffs. In: Process Engineering in the Food Industry. Eds R.W. Field and J.A. Howell, London, Elsevier Applied Science.Google Scholar
  4. Campden Food Preservation Research Association (CFPRA). (1982). Pumps for the Food Industry. Technical Memorandum No. 285.Google Scholar
  5. Campden Food Preservation Research Association (CFPRA). (1983). Hygienic Design of Food Processing Equipment. Report of the Working Party on Hygienic Design. Technical Manual No. 7.Google Scholar
  6. Campden Food Preservation Research Association (CFPRA). (1987). Hygiene Design of Liquid Handling Equipment for the Food Industry. Technical Manual No. 17.Google Scholar
  7. Cook, K. (1980). An `emblem’ to denote hygienic standards of food plant design. In: Hygienic Design and Operation of Food Plant. Ed. R. Jowitt, Chichester, Ellis Horwood.Google Scholar
  8. Council Directive, 89/392/EEC. (1989). On the approximation of the laws of the Member States relating to machinery (Machinery Directive). Official Journal of the European Communities, L183, 9–32.Google Scholar
  9. Daniels. G.G. (1980). Health and safety at work and hygiene requirements. In: Hygienic Design and Operation of Food Plant. Ed. R. Jowitt, Chichester, Ellis Horwood.Google Scholar
  10. Holm, S. (1980). Hygienic design of food plants and equipment. In: Hygienic Design and Operation of Food Plant. Ed. R. Jowitt, Chichester, Ellis Horwood.Google Scholar
  11. Joint Technical Committee, Food Manufacturers Federation (FMF) and Food Machinery Association (FMA). (1967). Hygienic Design of Food Plant. London, FMF/FMA.Google Scholar
  12. Milledge, J.J. and Jowitt, R. (1980). The cleanability of stainless steel used as a food contact surface. Proceedings of the Institute of Food Science and Technology, 13, 57–62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Shore, D.T. and Jowitt, R. (1971). Design and operation of food plant. In: Hygiene and Food Production. Ed. A. Fox, Edinburgh, Churchill Livingstone.Google Scholar
  14. Timperley, D.A. (1981). Modern cleaning and recovery systems and techniques. Journal of the Society of Dairy Technology, 34, 6–14.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Timperley, D.A. (1984). Surface finish and spray cleaning of stainless steel. In: Profitability of Food Processing. Institute of Chemical Engineers Symposium Series No. 84.Google Scholar
  16. Timperley, D.A. and Lawson, C.B. (1980). Test rigs for evaluation of hygiene in food plant design. In: Hygienic Design and Operation of Food Plant. Ed. R. Jowitt, Chichester, Ellis Horwood.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. J. Forsythe
    • 1
  • P. R. Hayes
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Life SciencesThe Nottingham Trent UniversityNottinghamUK
  2. 2.formerly of Department of MicrobiologyThe University of LeedsLeedsUK

Personalised recommendations