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Microbiological examining methods

  • S. J. Forsythe
  • P. R. Hayes

Abstract

There may be a variety of reasons why it is necessary to examine foods qualitatively and/or quantitatively for microorganisms. The principal objectives of microbiological testing are to ensure: (1) that the food meets certain statutory standards; (2) that the food meets internal standards set by the processing company or external standards required by the purchaser; (3) that food materials entering the factory for processing are of the required standard and/or meet a standard agreed with a supplier; (4) that process control and line sanitation are being maintained. The microbiological test methods used to monitor food quality are themselves also varied and are largely dependent on the food being analysed.

Keywords

Lactic Acid Bacterium Environmental Microbiology Staphylococcal Enterotoxin Food Protection Food Microbiology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. J. Forsythe
    • 1
  • P. R. Hayes
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Life SciencesThe Nottingham Trent UniversityNottinghamUK
  2. 2.formerly of Department of MicrobiologyThe University of LeedsLeedsUK

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