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Diseases of Sorghum

Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench
  • Robert F. Nyvall

Keywords

Leaf Spot Leaf Sheath Sweet Sorghum Leaf Blight Fusarium Moniliforme 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert F. Nyvall
    • 1
  1. 1.Plant Pathology and North Central Experiment StationUniversity of MinnesotaGrand RapidsUSA

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