Diseases of Red Clover

Trifolium pratense L.
  • Robert F. Nyvall


Downy Mildew Leaf Spot Trifolium PRATENSE Gray Leaf Spot Bean Yellow Mosaic Virus 


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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert F. Nyvall
    • 1
  1. 1.Plant Pathology and North Central Experiment StationUniversity of MinnesotaGrand RapidsUSA

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