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Requiem Æternam

The Last Five Hundred Years of Mammalian Species Extinctions
  • R. D. E. MacPhee
  • Clare Flemming
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Vertebrate Paleobiology book series (AIVP, volume 2)

Abstract

This contribution provides an analytical accounting of mammal species that have disappeared during the past 500 years—the “modern era” of this chapter. Our choice of date was dictated by several considerations, but two are paramount. ad 1500 marks more or less precisely the beginning of Europe’s expansion across the rest of the world, a portentous event in human history by any definition. It is an equally momentous date for natural history because it marks the point at which empirical knowledge of the planet began to burgeon exponentially. These two factors, linked for both good and ill for the past half-millennium, have affected every aspect of life on earth, and are thus fitting subjects to commemorate in a record such as this.

Keywords

Extinction Rate Smithsonian Institution Species Extinction Extinct Species Gray Whale 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. D. E. MacPhee
    • 1
  • Clare Flemming
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MammalogyAmerican Museum of Natural HistoryNew YorkUSA

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