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Box Models Revisited

  • Charles B. Officer
Part of the Marine Science book series (MR, volume 11)

Abstract

A methodology in terms of box models has been reexamined for the investigation of conservative and nonconservative quantities in estuaries. Both one and two dimensional models and both tidal exchange and circulation effects are included. Various types of loss relations, sources and sinks, and vertical exchanges are considered. The box model results are tested against analytic solutions of the same problems where available and against two more refined, hydro-dynamic numerical model results for a nonconservative loss problem and for a suspended sediment distribution.

The required inputs are salinity, estuary geometry and river flow, which are often known quantities. There are no undetermined or undefined hydrodynamic coefficients. In each case the relations are given by a set of linear algebraic equations. They can be solved by computer matrix algebra procedures or because of their particular form by successive approximations with a hand calculator.

The methods presented do not pretend to add to our physical oceanographie knowledge of estuarine circulation, mixing and the like. It is, however, hoped that they may be of use to those examining biological, chemical, engineering and geological distributions, transformations and other effects, which depend, in part, on estuarine hydrodynamics for their explanation.

Keywords

Suspended Sediment Biological Oxygen Demand Exchange Coefficient Turbidity Maximum Tidal Exchange 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles B. Officer
    • 1
  1. 1.Earth Sciences DepartmentDartmouth CollegeHanoverUSA

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