Advertisement

Endotoxin pp 681-684 | Cite as

Monoclonal Antibody to Lipid a Prevents the Development of Haemodynamic Disorders in Endotoxemia

  • A. A. Shnyra
  • G. F. Kalantarov
  • T. N. Vlasik
  • I. N. Trakht
  • A. Ju. Mayatnikov
  • A. L. Tabachnik
  • D. V. Borovikov
  • V. L. Golubykh
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 256)

Abstract

It has been recognized that gram-negative bacteriaemia is the major cause of hospital sepsis. The pathology of gram-negative sepsis is attributed to endotoxin. Endotoxins of all gram-negative bacteria have the same lipid moiety, so called lipid A, which is thought to be responsible for its pathogenic effects (6). Gram-negative endotoxaemia leads to an irreversible cardiovascular collapse (shock), acute pulmonary insufficiency, and disseminated vascular coagulation syndrome that can result in lethality up to 60–80%, despite antibiotic therapy (2). This prompted the search for immunotherapeutic approaches to the protection against gram-negative sepsis (1).

Keywords

Mean Arterial Pressure pUlmonary Vascular Resistance Haemodynamic Parameter Endotoxic Shock Lipid Moiety 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Baumgartner, J.-D., McCutchan, J. A., van Melle, G., Vogt, M., Luethy, R., Glauser, M. P., Ziegler, E. J., Klauber, M. R., Muehlen, E., Chiolero, R. and Geroulanos, S., 1985, Prevention of gram-negative shock and death in surgical patients by antibody to endotoxin core glycolipid. Lancet ii: 59.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Finland, M., 1980, Changing ecology of bacterial infection as related to antibacterial therapy. J. Infect. Dis. 122: 419.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Galanos, G., Luderitz, O. and Westphal, O., 1969, A new method for the extraction of R lipopolysaccharides. Eur. J. Biochem. 9: 245.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Galfre, G., Milstein, C. and Wright, B., 1979, Rat x rat hybrid myelomas and a monoclonal anti-Fd portion of mouse IgG. Nature 277: 131.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Kohler, G. and Milstein, C., 1975, Continuous culture of fused cells secreting antibody of predetermined specificity. Nature 256: 495.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Morrison, D. C. and Ulevitch, R. J., 1978, The effects of Bacterial Endotoxins on Host Mediation Systems. Amer. J. Pathol. 93(2): 526.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Tracey, K. J., Fong, Y., Hesse, D. G., Manogue, K. R., Lee, A. T., Kuo, G. C., Lowry, S. F. and Cerami, A., 1987, Anti-cachectin/TNF monoclonal antibodies prevent septic shock during lethal bacteraemia. Nature 300: 662.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. A. Shnyra
    • 1
  • G. F. Kalantarov
    • 1
  • T. N. Vlasik
    • 1
  • I. N. Trakht
    • 1
  • A. Ju. Mayatnikov
    • 1
  • A. L. Tabachnik
    • 1
  • D. V. Borovikov
    • 1
  • V. L. Golubykh
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Cellular Biology, Institute of Experimental Cardiology, National Cardiology Research CentreAcademy of Medical SciencesMoscowUSSR

Personalised recommendations