Advertisement

Diffuse Effects in the Central Nervous System. The Reticular Formation and the Dominant Focus

  • V. S. Rusinov

Abstract

Physiologists were familiar with diffuse effects in the central nervous system at the end of last century. Vvedenskii, for instance, knew that a wave of excitation can spread diffusely over the entire central nervous system and that this spread must have definite functional significance. “From the whole nervous system,” wrote Vvedenskii (1899), “a combined entity is obtained, in which the slightest change in one part is reflected more or less sensitively, at the same time or after a longer time interval, in all its other parts.”*

Keywords

Motor Cortex Electrical Activity Motor Response Caudate Nucleus Motor Area 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. N. E. Vvedenskii. Complete Collected Works [in Russian], Vol. 6, Leningrad University Press, Leningrad (1956), p. 184.Google Scholar
  2. N. E. Vvedenskii, Complete Collected Works [in Russian], Vol. 6, Leningrad University Press, Leningrad (1956), p. 188.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. S. Rusinov
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Higher Nervous Activity and NeurophysiologyAcademy of Sciences of the USSRMoscowUSSR

Personalised recommendations