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DNA Alkylation Adducts in Human Cells Attributable to Exposure to Alkylating Agents

  • R. Montesano
  • P. Degan
  • M. Serres
  • C. P. Wild
Chapter

Abstract

In studies on the etiology of human cancer, the determination of DNA adducts in human tissues is informative mainly from two points of view: firstly, in providing a marker of exposure to carcinogenic agents at an individual level and secondly in providing an insight on the biological relevance of these adducts to the process of carcinogenesis. In addition, these measurements, particularly if they reflect long-term exposure to carcinogens could result in an increase in the specificity and sensitivity of epidemiological studies.

Keywords

Human Tissue Oesophageal Cancer Stomach Mucosa Carcinogenic Agent Oesophageal Mucosa 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Montesano
    • 1
  • P. Degan
    • 1
  • M. Serres
    • 1
  • C. P. Wild
    • 1
  1. 1.Unit of Mechanisms of CarcinogenesisInternational Agency for Research on CancerLyonFrance

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