Reductionism and History: The Biology Between Scylla and Charybdis

  • Renzo Morchio


This paper analyses and carefully discusses the two terms: Reductionism and History, related to biology. In fact they are often used but never defined in biology. The results of this analysis is that the two quoted terms have no meaning when used in biology. This analysis asserts the autonomy of biology as a science and its possibility to formulate its own laws.


Past Event Biological Problem Physical Term Historical Science Human Event 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors.


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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Renzo Morchio
    • 1
  1. 1.Dipartimento di FisicaUniversità di GenovaItaly

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