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Spacecraft Radio Frequency Subsystem

  • Man K. Tam
  • Carroll F. Winn
Part of the Applications of Communications Theory book series (ACTH)

Abstract

The flight Radio Frequency Subsystem (RFS) is a vital component for the three spacecraft telecommunications functions of tracking, command, and telemetry. It is the radio and the signal processing equipment residing in the spacecraft that interfaces with the Control & Data Subsystem and performs two-way communications with the earth-based Deep Space Network. The RFS consists of all the elements for RF reception, demodulation, modulation, and transmission, including those for command detection and telemetry modulation.

Keywords

Power Amplifier Automatic Gain Control Deep Space Network Planetary Mission Subcarrier Frequency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Man K. Tam
  • Carroll F. Winn

There are no affiliations available

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