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Differential Migration Revisited

Latitudinal Segregation by Age and Sex Class
  • Daniel A. Cristol
  • Mitchell B. Baker
  • Chris Carbone
Chapter
Part of the Current Ornithology book series (CUOR, volume 15)

Abstract

The annual migrations of birds are impressive phenomena that raise interesting physiological, evolutionary, and ecological questions. One facet of migration that has long intrigued biologists is the occurrence of differential migration, in which distance traveled differs between portions of a population. For example, in the eastern United States female Dark-eyed Juncos (Junco hyemalis) migrate farther into the winter range than males (Ketterson and Nolan, 1976), and among Snow Geese (Anser caerulescens) blue-morph and white-morph individuals separate longitudinally during migration (Cooke et al., 1975). (All common and scientific names follow Sibley and Monroe, 1990, and can be found in Tables I–III unless given in the text).

Keywords

Migration Distance Early Arrival House Finch Population Class Differential Migration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel A. Cristol
    • 1
  • Mitchell B. Baker
    • 2
  • Chris Carbone
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of BiologyCollege of William and MaryWilliamsburgUSA
  2. 2.Animal Behavior Graduate GroupUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA
  3. 3.Institute of ZoologyZoological Society of LondonLondonUK

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