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Pozzolans and the Pozzolanic Reaction

  • Vance H. Dodson

Abstract

The most often used mineral admixture in the modern concrete industry is the pozzolan. A pozzolan, and there are many of them, is defined as “siliceous or siliceous and aluminous materials which in themselves possess little or no cementitious value but will, in finely divided form and in the presence of moisture, chemically react with calcium hydroxide at ordinary temperatures to form compounds possessing cementitious properties” [1]. This chemical reaction between the siliceous and/or siliceous-alumina components in the pozzolan, calcium hydroxide and water is called the pozzolanic reaction.

Keywords

Compressive Strength Portland Cement Silica Fume Calcium Hydroxide Blast Furnace Slag 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

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  • Vance H. Dodson

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