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Air Entraining Admixtures

  • Vance H. Dodson

Abstract

While the early history of the use of air entraining admixtures is ambiguous, the author has heard, but not read, that the early Romans and Greeks added them to their pozzolanic mixes to increase their workability. Probably blood or animal fat was used for this purpose. Before proceeding further with the evolution of this class of admixtures, it should be defined in acceptable and modern terms. An air entraining admixture is simply one that is added to either portland cement paste, mortar, or concrete for the purpose of entraining air in the respective masses . As you will read later in this chapter, the entrainment of air in concrete has a number of beneficial effects, when used properly, on certain of its properties. The most important of these is an increase in resistance to frost attack and to deterioration, due to exposure to repeated freezing and thawing.

Keywords

Portland Cement Chord Length Alkali Content Fresh Concrete American Concrete Institute 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vance H. Dodson

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