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Admixtures—General Concepts

  • Vance H. Dodson

Abstract

An admixture is defined as a material other than water, aggregate, and hydraulic cement which might be added to concrete before or during its mixing. This is not to be confused with the term, addition, which is either interground with or blended into a portland cement during its manufacture. An addition, is classified as being either (1) a processing addition, which aids in the manufacture and handling of the finished product, or (2) a functional addition which modifies the use properties of the cement.

Keywords

Compressive Strength Portland Cement Cement Content Fine Aggregate Annual Book 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vance H. Dodson

There are no affiliations available

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