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Hydrotherapy can Modulate Peripheral Leukocytes: An Approach to Alternative Medicine

  • N. Yamaguchi
  • S. Shimizu
  • H. Izumi
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 546)

Abstract

Along with treating illness, one of the purposes of alternative medicine is to promote the quality of life (QOL) of healthy people. In Japan, centuries of tradition have shown that alternative therapies like hot spring hydrotherapy, acupuncture, and herbal medicine enhance the QOL of empirically healthy individuals. Evidence has been accumulating that this may be the result of immune system regulation. The scientific basis, however, has not yet been established.

Keywords

Young Group Lymphocyte Subset Horizon Point Cellular Immune Function Natural Killer Cell Count 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Yamaguchi
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. Shimizu
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. Izumi
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of SerologyKanazawa Meidical UniversityUchinada, Kahoku-gun IshikawaJapan
  2. 2.Ishikawa Natural Medicinal Products Research CenterFukubatake, KanazawaJapan

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