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Social Aspects of Communication in Children with Autism

  • J. Gregory Olley
Part of the Current Issues in Autism book series (CIAM)

Abstract

We sophisticated adults have long held communication to be one of the marks of our uniqueness. That belief has suffered a bit in recent years as researchers continue to document the complex communication skills of even very young infants (Kaye, 1981). Our self-esteem took a particularly strong blow when scientists at the University of Washington and Dartmouth College recently revealed a communication system among willows, maples, and poplars (Begley, 1983). In fact, it appears that communication is more prevalent than anyone had believed just a few years ago.

Keywords

Social Skill Social Aspect Autistic Child Communication Problem Handicapped Learner 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Gregory Olley
    • 1
  1. 1.Division TEACCHUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

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