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Issues in the Assessment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Children

  • A. J. FinchJr.
  • Timothy K. Daugherty
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Abstract

The assessment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in children is of considerable interest because of the need for the rapid and accurate identification of children who are experiencing excessive stress following a natural or human-made disaster. Immediately following a disaster, the available resources must be efficiently used and mental health workers would like to be able to identify those individuals who are the most in need of services. In order to study or treat the disorder, we must be able to identify it. In addition, if we are going to treat the disorder and evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment, we need a reliable and valid measure of the disorder.

Keywords

Posttraumatic Stress Adolescent Psychiatry Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory Halo Effect 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. J. FinchJr.
    • 1
  • Timothy K. Daugherty
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyThe CitadelCharlestonUSA

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