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Strengthening Social Policies in Behalf of Children and Families(1)

  • Edward Zigler
  • Kirby A. Heller
Part of the Child Nurturance book series (CHILDNUR, volume 4)

Abstract

The myth that we are a child-oriented society continues to exist in this country. Yet the condition of our nation’s children is poor and getting worse. This condition is substantiated by a host of disturbing social indicators documented in several sources, such as the Carnegie council report, All Our Children (Keniston, 1977), and the 1976 report of the Advisory Committee on Child Development of the National Academy of Sciences (note 1). Problems faced by parents and children in four areas—health, child abuse, child care, and out-of-home child placements—will be described to highlight the invalidity of the myth.

Keywords

Child Care Child Abuse Child Development Foster Care Head Start 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Footnote

  1. (1).
    This chapter is drawn from Dr. Edward Zigler’s keynote address “Child Nurturance: A System’s Perspective for the 1980s” presented on January 29, 1980 as part of the Michigan State University’s International Year of the Child “To Rear a Child” lecture series.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward Zigler
    • 1
  • Kirby A. Heller
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyYale UniversityNew HavenUSA

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