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The Synthesis, Storage and Degradation of Plant Natural Products: Cyanogenic Glycosides as an Example

  • Adrian J. Cutler
  • Eric E. Conn
Part of the Recent Advances in Phytochemistry book series (RAPT, volume 16)

Abstract

Cyanogenic glycosides are natural products found in a wide variety of plant genera including Sorghum, Prunus, Linum, Manihot and Passiflora.

Keywords

Mesophyll Protoplast Cyanogenic Glycoside Free Cyanide Cyanogenic Glucoside Plant Natural Product 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adrian J. Cutler
    • 1
  • Eric E. Conn
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry and BiophysicsUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA

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