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Criteria for Evaluation of Biological Literature

  • Sol M. Michaelson
  • James C. Lin
Chapter

Abstract

Most of the research on biological effects of microwave/radiofrequency (MW/RF) energies has been done with small rodents having coefficients of heat absorption, field concentration effects, body surface areas, and thermoregulatory mechanisms significantly different from those of man. Even closely related species can differ widely in their responses. The literature is replete with “anomalous” reactions. Thus, results of exposure of common laboratory animals cannot be readily extrapolated to man unless a comparative biology approach and some form of “scaling” among different animal species, and from animal to man, is used in an appropriate manner to obtain quantitatively valid extrapolation relationships from the observed data.

Keywords

Microwave Theory Tech Microwave Exposure Biological Literature Radiofrequency Radiation Nonionizing Radiation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sol M. Michaelson
    • 1
  • James C. Lin
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Rochester School of Medicine and DentistryRochesterUSA
  2. 2.University of IllinoisChicagoUSA

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