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The Common Integument (Skin)

  • Sol M. Michaelson
  • James C. Lin
Chapter

Abstract

From anatomical and physiological aspects, it is appropriate to consider the skin in a review of the pathophysiological consequences of exposure to RF/MW energy. Because the skin covers the entire body, it has the greatest potential for most immediate exposure; it also contains the nerve endings for thermal sensation of microwave energy and plays an important part in thermal regulation of animals.

Keywords

Microwave Irradiation Skin Temperature Temperature Sensation Pain Threshold Pain Sensation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sol M. Michaelson
    • 1
  • James C. Lin
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Rochester School of Medicine and DentistryRochesterUSA
  2. 2.University of IllinoisChicagoUSA

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