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Intracellular Steps in the Biosynthesis of Collagen

  • Darwin J. Prockop
  • Richard A. Berg
  • Kari I. Kivirikko
  • Jouni Uitto

Abstract

The biosynthesis of collagen has many similarities to the biosynthesis of other proteins synthesized for “export,” but collagen biosynthesis is distinguished by at least two prominent features: (1) the protein is first synthesized as a precursor form which fulfills several important functions, and (2) the biosynthesis involves several unusual posttranslational modifications which occur after assembly of amino acids into the three polypeptide chains of the molecule and which are essential for some of its critical structural features.

Keywords

Triple Helix Prolyl Hydroxylase Tendon Cell Lysyl Residue Peptide Extension 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Darwin J. Prockop
    • 1
  • Richard A. Berg
    • 1
  • Kari I. Kivirikko
    • 1
  • Jouni Uitto
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryCollege of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Rutgers Medical SchoolPiscatawayUSA

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