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Regional Mobility Impacts Assessment of Highway Automation

  • Mark A. Miller
  • Anne Bresnock
  • Steven E. Shladover
  • Edward H. Lechner
Chapter

Abstract

Urban traffic congestion and air pollution are crucial issues in most metropolitan areas, but are more acute in Southern California than in most other North American regions. The PATH Program at the Institute of Transportation Studies, University of California, Berkeley and the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) have investigated some of the long-term regional impacts that could result from implementation of advanced highway technologies (automation and electrification) in the Los Angeles area. This chapter focuses on the evaluation of mobility impacts of highway automation technologies applied to portions of the Southern California freeway network in 2025.

Keywords

Central Business District Regional Mobility Automate Vehicle Freeway Lane Automate Link 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark A. Miller
    • 1
  • Anne Bresnock
    • 2
  • Steven E. Shladover
    • 1
  • Edward H. Lechner
    • 3
  1. 1.California PATH ProgramUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA
  2. 2.California State Polytechnic UniversityPomonaUSA
  3. 3.Science Applications International CorporationSystems Control Technology GroupLos AltosUSA

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