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The Effects of AHS on the Environment

  • Matthew J. Barth
Chapter

Abstract

As a key culmination of ITS technology, an Automated Highway System (AHS) will substantially improve the safety and efficiency of highway travel. The general AHS concept consists of instrumented vehicles operating on instrumented roadways without operator intervention.(1) Various sensors and communication devices will link the vehicles and roadway, virtually eliminating driver error and maximizing traffic performance. Drivers equipped with a vehicle instrumented for AHS operation will be able to enter an AHS through a check-in area and proceed onto a transition lane, where control of the vehicle will be assumed by the AHS. The system will then move the vehicle onto one of the automated lanes where it then merges with other traffic. When the driver’s destination is reached, the system will move the vehicle back to the transition lane where the driver will be able to resume control of the vehicle.(1)

Keywords

Traffic Flow Vehicle Emission Power Demand Intelligent Transportation System Emission Control System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matthew J. Barth
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Engineering, Center for Environmental Research and TechnologyUniversity of CaliforniaRiversideUSA

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