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Radiative and Nonradiative Rates in Luminescence Centers

  • C. W. Struck
  • W. H. Fonger
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSB, volume 249)

Abstract

The Wp function and related functions for the derivative and the z op-erators are defined and evaluated. These functions are used to explain the luminescence optical bands and the efficiencies of Eu3+, Tm3+, and Yb3+in oxysulfide hosts. Their usefulness in understanding luminescence centers in general is illustrated in model examples.

Keywords

Recursion Formula SchrOdinger Equation Nonradiative Transition Radiative Rate Nonradiative Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. W. Struck
    • 1
  • W. H. Fonger
    • 2
  1. 1.GTE Laboratories Inc.USA
  2. 2.PrincetonUSA

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