Active and Passive ADP Components in Mammalian and Avian Ears

  • Susan J. Norton
  • Edwin W. Rubel
Part of the Lecture Notes in Biomathematics book series (LNBM, volume 87)

Abstract

In recent years, a number of investigators have suggested that the mammalian cochlea consists of two systems: one sharply tuned and physiologically vulnerable, and the other broadly tuned and relatively invulnerable. Davis (1983) suggested these two systems were active and passive, respectively. The majority of data supporting this hypothesis come from animal studies including Mossbauer measurements of basilar membrane displacement (e.g. Sellick. Patuzzi and Johnstone. 1982; Johnstone. Patuzzi and Sellick, 1984; Johnstone. Patuzzi and Yates, 1986) and recordings from single 8th nerve fibers (c.g. Sellick, Patuzzi and Johnstone, 1982; and sec Kiang et al., 1986 for a review).

Keywords

Hydrolysis Migration Toxicity Hydrate Hydrochloride 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan J. Norton
    • 1
  • Edwin W. Rubel
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Hearing and SpeechUniversity of Kansas Medical CenterKansas CityUSA
  2. 2.Hearing Development LaboratoriesUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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