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Chaotic Dynamics of Otoacoustic Emissions

  • Douglas H. Keefe
  • Edward M. Burns
  • Robert Ling
  • Bernice Laden
Part of the Lecture Notes in Biomathematics book series (LNBM, volume 87)

Abstract

The discovery of otoacoustic emissions (OAE) has encourage? a re-asessment of active mechanisms in hearing. Nonlinear oscillators are attractive candidates for understanding active processes in hearing, and otoacoustic emissions in particular. Even the simplest nonlinear oscillators used in current theories shww hmlt cycle behavior but they are also capable of more complex, chaotic, behavior. For example, the forced van der Pol oscillator utilized in models of hearing (Duifhuis et al., 1986; Tubis et al., 1988) is also known to exhibit chaotic behavior. It is unknown whether OAEs actually exhibit chaotic behavior.

Keywords

Mutual Information Correlation Dimension Otoacoustic Emission Chaotic Signal Taylor Vortex Flow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Douglas H. Keefe
    • 1
  • Edward M. Burns
    • 2
  • Robert Ling
    • 2
  • Bernice Laden
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Music, DN-10University of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  2. 2.Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, JG-15University of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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