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Computerization Movements and the Mobilization of Support for Computing

  • Rob Kling
  • Suzanne Iacono

Abstract

THERE is a major mobilization to foster computerization in many institutional sectors in the United States and Western Europe. Computerization is a social process for providing access to and support for computer equipment and computer-based services to be used in activities such as teaching, accounting, writing, designing circuits, financial payments, etc. Computerization entails social choices about the level of appropriate investment and control over equipment and expertise, as well as choices of equipment. Many organizations are adopting computing equipment much more rapidly than they understand how to organize positive forms of social life around it. However, the most fervent advocates of computerization see the actual pace of computerization in schools, offices, factories, and homes as slower than they wish [Papert, 1980; Yourdon, 1986; See also Kaplan, 1983].

Keywords

Social Movement Social Choice Movement Organization Computer Industry Inventory Control System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rob Kling
  • Suzanne Iacono

There are no affiliations available

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