Advertisement

Seeking Security Through Technological Means

  • Colin Beardon

Abstract

THERE is no issue more critical to our future than that of world peace. There are enough weapons to kill the entire population of the world several times over despite recent moves towards limiting their numbers. The cost of maintaining this system is a tremendous burden for us all. Economically, it prevents the solution of many pressing world problems, while smaller nations are coerced into military alliances they cannot afford and often do not want. Environmentally, the manufacture and replacement of nuclear weapons produces radioactive materials that constitute a serious hazard, while the pervading climate of fear and aggression may be doing permanent psychological damage to young people.

Keywords

Nuclear Weapon Early Warning System Ballistic Missile Threat Assessment Cruise Missile 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Sources

  1. [1]
    Andriole, S. [ 1984 ], Computer-Based Crisis Management Technology: Time Was and Time Will. In: National Security Forecasting and Management, edited by Hopple, G., Andriole, S. & Freely, A., pp. 85–92. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press.Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    Arkin, W. & Fieldhouse [ 1984 ], Nuclear Weapon Command, Control and Communications. In: S.I.P.RI. Yearbook 1984, pp. 455–516. Stockholm: SIPRI.Google Scholar
  3. [3]
    Ball, D. [ 1981 ], Can Nuclear War be Controlled? Adelphi Papers no. 169. London: International Institute for Strategic Studies.Google Scholar
  4. [4]
    Barnaby, F. [ 1980 ], Prospects for Peace. Pergamon: Oxford.Google Scholar
  5. [5]
    Barnaby, F. [ 1982 ], Microelectronics in War. In: Microelectronics and Society, edited by Friedrichs, G. & Schaff, A. Oxford: Pergamon.Google Scholar
  6. [6]
    Beardon, C. [ 1983 ], The Last Bug in the World. New Zealand Interface, July 1983, 33–34.Google Scholar
  7. [7]
    Beardon, C. [ 1985 ], Computer Culture: the information revolution in New Zealand. Auckland: Reed-Methuen.Google Scholar
  8. [8]
    Bereanu, B. [ 1983 ], Self Activation of the World Nuclear Weapon System. Journal of Peace Research, 20, 1, 49–57.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. [9]
    Berkeley, E. [ 1970 ], The Social Responsibility of Computer People. In: Perspectives on the Computer Revolution, edited by Z. Pylyshyn, pp. 461–471. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
  10. [10]
    Bethe, H. et al [ 1984 ], Space-based Ballistic Missile Defense. Scientific American, 251, 4, Oct 1984, 37–47.Google Scholar
  11. [11]
    Borning, A. [1985], Computer System Reliability and Nuclear War. Technical Report 85–10–01, Computer Science Dept, University of Washington, also in Communications of the A.C.M., 30, 2, Feb 87, 112 – 131.Google Scholar
  12. [12]
    Bracken, P. [ 1983 ], The Command and Control of Nuclear Forces. New Haven, Conn: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  13. [13]
    Carter, A. [ 1985 ], The Command and Control of Nuclear War. Scientific American, 252, 1, Jan 85, 20–27.Google Scholar
  14. [14]
    de Arcangelis, M. [ 1985 ], Electronic Warfare. Poole, Dorset: Blandford Press.Google Scholar
  15. [15]
    Dumas, L. [ 1980 ], Human Fallibility and Weapons. Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 38, 11, Nov 80, 15–20.Google Scholar
  16. [16]
    Ford, D. [ 1985 ], The Button: the Pentagon’s Strategic Command and Control System. New York: Simon and Schuster.Google Scholar
  17. [17]
    Frei, D. [ 1983 ], Risks of Unintentional Nuclear War. London: Croom Helm/ UN Institute for Disarmament Research.Google Scholar
  18. [18]
    Garwin, R. [ 1981 ], Launch Under Attack to Redress Minuteman Vulnerability. International Security, 4, 3, 117–39.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. [19]
    Gray, C.H. [ 1988 ], The Strategic Computing Program at Four Years: Implications and Initiatives. AI & Society, 2, 2, 141–149.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. [20]
    Gregory, S. & Edwards, A. [ 1988 ], A Handbook of Nuclear Weapons Accidents. Peace Research Report No. 20, School of Peace Studies, University of Bradford.Google Scholar
  21. [21]
    Grinspoon, L. [ 1984 ], Crisis Behavior. Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 41, 1, Apr 84, 25–28.Google Scholar
  22. [22]
    Hafemeister, D. [ 1985 ], Advances in Verification Technology. Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 41, 1, Jan 85, 35–40.Google Scholar
  23. [23]
    Halliday, F. [ 1987 ], Cold War, the Peace Movements and the Third World. In: On the Brink: nuclear proliferation and the 3rd World, edited by Worsley, P. & Hadjor, K.B., pp. 94–104. London: Third World Communications.Google Scholar
  24. [24]
    Hart, G. & Goldwater, B. [ 1980 ], Recent false alerts from the nation’s missile attack warning system. Report to the Committee on Armed Services, US Senate, US Govt publ No. 81–2992.Google Scholar
  25. [25]
    Hoare, C. [ 1981 ], The Emperor’s Old Clothes. Communications of the A.C.M., 24, 2, Feb 81, 75–83.Google Scholar
  26. [26]
    Kogut, J. & Weissman, M. [ 1986 ], Taking the Pledge Against Star Wars. Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 42, 1, Jan 86, 27–30.Google Scholar
  27. [27]
    Lin, H. [ 1985 ], The Development of Software for Ballistic Missile Defense. Scientific American, 253, 6, Dec 85, 32–39.Google Scholar
  28. [28]
    Malik, R. [1975], And Tomorrow... the World London: Millington.Google Scholar
  29. [29]
    Martin, J. [ 1985 ], SDI: The Technical Alternatives. Defense Science, Apr/May 85.Google Scholar
  30. [30]
    Mosco, V. [ 1989 ], The Pay-Per Society, Computers and Communication in the Information Age, Toronto: Garamond.Google Scholar
  31. [31]
    Myers, W. [ 1986 ], The Star Wars Software Debate. Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 42, 2, Feb 86, 31–35.Google Scholar
  32. [32]
    Nikutta, R. [ 1987 ], Artificial intelligence and the automated tactical battlefield. In: Arms and Artificial Intelligence, edited by A. Din, pp. 100–134. Oxford: SIPRI/Orford University Press.Google Scholar
  33. [33]
    Parnas, D. [ 1985 ], Software Aspects of Strategic Defense Systems. Communications of the A.C.M., 28, 12, Dec 85, 1326–35.Google Scholar
  34. [34]
    Paxson, E. [ 1972 ], Computers and National Security. In: Computers and the Problems of Society, edited by Paxson, E, pp. 65–89. AFIPS Press.Google Scholar
  35. [35]
    Perrow, C. [ 1984 ]. Normal Accidents: living with high-risk technologies. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  36. [36]
    Pohl, I. [ 1986 ], SDI Software: AI is not the answer. Software Engineering Notes, 11, 2, Apr 86, 18–19.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. [37]
    Rosen, S. [ 1969 ], Electronic Computers: a historical survey. Computing Surveys, 1, 1, 7–36.Google Scholar
  38. [38]
    Sagan, S. [ 1985 ], Nuclear Alerts and Crisis Management. International Security, 9, 4, Spr 85.Google Scholar
  39. [39]
    Shulman, S. [ 1986 ], Stopping Star Wars. Science for the People, 18, 1, Jan/Feb 86, 10–15.Google Scholar
  40. [40]
    Smith, B.C. [1985], The Limits of Correctness. Paper prepared for the 5th Congress of the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War, Budapest, Hungary, Jun 28-Jul 1 1985.Google Scholar
  41. [41]
    Stefik, M.J. [ 1985 ], Strategic Computing at DARPA: Overview and Assessment. Communications of the A.C.M., 28, 7, Jul 85, 690–704.Google Scholar
  42. [42]
    Stein, D. [ 1983 ], Electromagnetic Pulse-the uncertain certainty. Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, 41, 3, Mar 83, 52–56.Google Scholar
  43. [43]
    Steinbruner, J. [ 1984 ], Launch Under Attack. Scientific American, 250, 1, Jan 84, 37–47.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. [44]
    Thompson, H. [ 1985 ], Empowering Automatic Decision-Making Systems: General Intelligence, Responsibility and Moral Sensibility. In: Proceedings 9th International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence, (Los Angeles 1985 ), pp. 1281–83.Google Scholar
  45. [45]
    Thompson, J. [ 1985 ], Psychological Aspects of Nuclear War. London: British Psychological Association/John Wiley.Google Scholar
  46. [46]
    Trappl, R. [ 1985 ], Impacts of Artificial Intelligence: An Overview. In: Impacts of Artificial Intelligence, edited by R. Trappl. Amsterdam: North-Holland.Google Scholar
  47. [47]
    Ulsamer, E. [ 1973 ], Computers-Key to Tomorrow’s Air Force. Air Force Magazine, 56, 7, 46–52.Google Scholar
  48. [48]
    United States Congress [ 1984 ], Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, Strategic Defense and Anti Satellite Weapons, 98th Congress, 2d Session, April 25, 1982. Washington, DC: US Govt Printing Office.Google Scholar
  49. [49]
    United States Department of Defense, [ 1986 ], Soviet Military Power, 5th edn. Washington, DC: US Govt Printing Office.Google Scholar
  50. [50]
    Weizenbaum, J. [ 1976 ], Computer Power and Human Reason. San Fransisco: W.H. Freeman & Co.Google Scholar
  51. [51]
    Wilson, A. [ 1970 ], War Gaming, Harmondsworth, Middx: Pengu in Books.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Colin Beardon

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations