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The Role of Radiocarbon Dating in Maya Archaeology: Four Decades of Research

  • Scott L. Fedick
  • Karl A. Taube
Conference paper

Abstract

Since its inception in the 1950s, 14C dating has had a profound role in our understanding of the ancient Maya of southern Mexico and Central America, both in terms of culture history and developmental processes. In the case of the Classic Maya period, from AD 300–900, 14C dating has primarily served to augment two other forms of interrelated dating: ceramic chronology and the Long Count system of calendric notation. In this sense, the advent of 14C dating has been less of a revolution than a gradual resolution of several competing chronologic constructs for the Classic Maya.

Keywords

American Antiquity Maya Region Peabody Museum Archaic Period Maya Area 
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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Scott L. Fedick
  • Karl A. Taube

There are no affiliations available

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