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Cells from Mature Human Milk are Capable of Cytokine Production Following in Vitro Stimulation

  • Joanna Hawkes
  • Dani-Louise Bryan
  • Robert Gibson
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 554)

Abstract

Leukocytes in milk may contribute to development of mucosal defense mechanisms in the recipient infant (Hanson 1999). The principal types of leukocytes found in human milk are granulocytes, monocytes/macrophages, and lymphocytes. Each of these cell types could be responsible for production of a variety of cytokines, and a number of investigators have examined this possibility using cells isolated from colostrum (Rudloff et al. 1992; Subiza et al. 1988; Skansen-Saphir et al. 1993). In contrast, little information is available regarding cytokine production by cells obtained from mature milk or the relationship between milk cell and peripheral blood cell cytokine production. The aim of this study was to determine the capacity of a mixed population of human milk cells (HMC) to produce the potentially pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α and compare the cytokine profile with that obtained from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) collected from the same mothers.

Keywords

Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Cytokine Production Respiratory Syncytial Virus Human Milk lX106 Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joanna Hawkes
    • 1
  • Dani-Louise Bryan
    • 1
  • Robert Gibson
    • 1
  1. 1.Child Nutrition Research Centre at Child Health Research Institute, Flinders Medical CentreFlinders UniversityAdelaideAustralia

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