The Anti-Infective Activity of Human Milk is Potentially Greater than the Sum of its Microbicidal Components

  • C. E. Isaacs
  • J. H. Jia
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 554)

Abstract

The immune system present in human milk must inactivate a wide spectrum of microorganisms. In order to accomplish this function milk contains multiple protective factors, many of which interact in an additive or synergistic manner. Antimicrobial factors in human milk provide layers of protection using multiple, often redundant, mechanisms that attack pathogens by various mechanisms. As a result of milk containing combinations of protective factors with complementary properties, the total antimicrobial activity provided to the infant’s gastrointestinal tract is likely to be significantly greater than is suggested by measuring microbicidal components individually. The present study was undertaken to determine the effect of using antiviral lipids and peptides alone and in combination on the minimum concentrations of each factor required to inactivate herpes simplex virus (HSV).

Keywords

Glycerol Monoglyceride Octyl Trachoma 

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Reference

  1. Lampe MF, Ballweber LM, Isaacs CE, Patton DL, Stamm WE. Killing of Chlamydia trachomatis by novel antimicrobial lipids adapted from compounds in human breast milk. Antimicrobial Agents Chemother 1998;42:1239–1244.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. E. Isaacs
    • 1
  • J. H. Jia
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Developmental BiochemistryInstitute for Basic Research in Developmental DisabilitiesStaten IslandUSA

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