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Positive Effect of Human Milk on Neurobehavioral and Cognitive Development of Premature Infants

  • Arthur I. Eidelman
  • Ruth Feldman
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 554)

Abstract

Several large-scale studies have demonstrated that term infants who were breastfed scored higher on IQ tests in childhood, while other studies noted that once sociodemographic and parenting style factors are controlled, the effect of breastfeeding on intelligence is attenuated, suggesting that environmental conditions, not human milk per se, are the decisive factors (Jain et al. 2002). Evidence for the positive effects of human milk on the cognitive development of preterm infants is more conclusive (Horwood et al. 2001).

Keywords

Human Milk Maternal Depression Mental Development Index Oxytocin Release Maternal Mood 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arthur I. Eidelman
    • 1
  • Ruth Feldman
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Neonatology, Shaare Zedek Medical CenterHebrew University School of MedicineJerusalemIsrael
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyBar Ilan UniversityRamat GanIsrael

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