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Social Capital and Breastfeeding Initiation among Puerto Rican Women

  • Alex K. Anderson
  • David A. Himmelgreen
  • Yu-Kuei Peng
  • Sofia Segura-Pérez
  • Rafael Pérez-Escamilla
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 554)

Abstract

Little is known about breastfeeding rates and factors that affect the likelihood for ever breastfeeding (BF) among Puerto Rican women residing in the continental United States. A cross-sectional study was designed to examine acculturation and food behaviors among low-income Latinos in Hartford, CT. We examined the association of social capital with the likelihood of BF among women 17 to 40 years of age with a child less than 6 years of age. Chi-square analyses were used to examine the bivariate association between BF and independent variables. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate the independent association between social capital and BF after controlling for confounders. Backward stepwise multivariate logistic regression results indicate that mothers who exchanged services with friends or relatives were more likely to have breastfed the previous child (OR=2.65; 95% CI=1.16–6.05) and also more likely to have ever breastfed the index child (OR=2.08; 95% CI=1.07–4.05) compared with their counterparts who did not exchange services. Mothers who listened to only Latino music (vs. those listening to non-Latino music) were less likely (OR=0.49; 95% 0=0.25–0.95) to have breastfed the index child. Findings suggest that social capital, as represented by exchange of services with friends or relatives, is associated with a higher likelihood of BF in this Puerto Rican community.

Keywords

Social Capital Exchange Service Bivariate Association Index Child Previous Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alex K. Anderson
    • 1
  • David A. Himmelgreen
    • 2
  • Yu-Kuei Peng
    • 1
  • Sofia Segura-Pérez
    • 3
  • Rafael Pérez-Escamilla
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Nutritional SciencesUniversity of ConnecticutStorrsUSA
  2. 2.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA
  3. 3.Hispanic Health Council, Inc.HartfordUSA

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