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Regional and global stratigraphic cycles

  • Andrew D. Miall

Abstract

The development of the science of planetary geology, our increasing familiarity with views of the earth taken from satellites and from outer space, and the increasing sophistication of geophysical techniques for exploring the earth’s interior have all encouraged scientists to adopt a planetary perspective to questions of global history and to current problems of biologic, climatic, and geologic change (e.g., Anderson, 1984; Maxwell, 1984). This is increasingly the case in the field of stratigraphic geology. Although it has been one of the great triumphs of the science of sedimentology to demonstrate the importance of autocylic sedimentary mechanisms and the ubiquity of lateral facies changes (Chapter 4), in some respects the old stratigrapher’s view of the earth as a simple layer cake, or an onion, comprising numerous superimposed, thin, uniform layers, remains true.

Keywords

Geological Society America Bulletin Seismic Stratigraphy Milankovitch Cycle Cyclic Sedimentation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew D. Miall
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of GeologyUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

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